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Serbian School Activator Revisited

In January I proudly presented my most beautiful site, www.skolasrpskog.com and the new concept of teaching Serbian online, which I called SkolaSrpskog Activator. It's been working for six months now, and I am really satisfied with all the language materials I've created in this period:

1. My Youtube channel www.youtube.com/learnserbian has 100 videos more (there were only about 20 up to 2011, and now there are 125, with 99 being visible).

2. The initial concept of an online session which was to consist of a language exercise, recipe and a song, has been changed, according to the feedback of all the subscribers. Still, at the end of each session, we enjoy singing one of the songs which I carefully choose each week.

3. I started adding all the explanations and exercises into pdf files, and also creating fun quizzes with the instand feedback. Some of the pages based on the situational phrases can be downloaded in pdf format from www.SkolaSrpskog.com.

4. During Easter, I organized some kind of an "online language quest" and we all had fun chasing Easter eggs on the site (some of them are still hidden there :) and doing fun exercises in Serbian. Some of the participants won  free SkolaSrpskog Activator subscription, some won free 1:1 lessons, and I won many new friends and great ideas for our lessons :-)

5. I started gathering anonymous feedback, and here are just a few lines:
"Everything is super"
"I appreciate the amount of work the instructor puts into the experience. The YouTube videos are helpful"
"Everithing, and my teacher is lovely and flexibile, she love teaching us"

However, all that I've done and created so far is hardly mentioning  in comparison to the effort my students have put into their work. They regularly attend the lessons and I am really proud of each one of them.

Today, on Britannia bookshop site, one of my most proficient students of Serbian, Jelena from Санкт-Петербург, Russia  published  the first part of our interview, which was very much inspired by our SkolaSrpskog Activator lessons.

Hvala Jelena i hvala svim đacima, Jani, Fabijanu, Matiji, Lari, Mirku, Milici, Toniju, Silvini, Ljubi i Tini na ukazanom poverenju, istrajnosti i velikom trudu :) U avgustu ćemo napraviti mali raspust, i onda opet nastavljamo sa časovima u septembru.

For all of you who'd like to learn more about SkolaSrpskog Activator, do join FB SkolaSrpskog Podcast group and you will be invited to attend our Third Friday Free Serbian lessons.

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